Cities need these 5 things to become hubs for social entrepreneurship - Generocity Philly

Results

Jan. 5, 2016 10:35 am

Cities need these 5 things to become hubs for social entrepreneurship

Apparently, Kansas City is doing it — and they followed these steps. It seems that most of the pieces are in place for Philadelphia.

Does Philly have what it takes?

(Photo by Flickr user Ron Reiring, used under a Creative Commons license)

Philadelphia has gained a reputation as an eds and meds town. Could it become a hub for social entrepreneurship, too?

According to this piece in MiLLENNiAL (and recently shared by Fortune), there are five necessary components to turning a city into a hub for social entrepreneurship.

Read the full story

1. “Capitalize on the strengths of area universities”

Philly’s strong on this front, led inside the city by University of Pennsylvania‘s Wharton Social Impact Initiative and followed by pushes within Temple University (Net ImpactInnovation & Entrepreneurship Institute) and Drexel (Lindy Institute, Close School of Entrepreneurship). Institutions right outside the city limits can be just as influential.

2. “Rally local foundations”

The article argues that foundations can be a key driver for social entrepreneurship if they’re on the same page — hosting events, making grants to nonprofits and social enterprises and working together to “equip social entrepreneurs with cutting-edge research.”

Still, there are some who say Philadelphia’s largest foundations don’t really do too much for Philadelphia anymore.

3. “The effort must be driven by the social entrepreneurs themselves”

John Moore, president at local impact investing fund Investors’ Circle Philadelphia told us something similar last spring, adding an important caveat: There needs to be a community supporting those social entrepreneurs. They can’t power the engine themselves.

From our Partners

4. “Embrace the startup culture”

Philly’s got this one in the bag.

5. “Remember this is a long term play”

It may seem like Philadelphia has most of these components in place, but it takes time to build something sustainable. It will take a cohesive community with a collective vision for the future.

-30-
Tony Abraham

Tony Abraham is Technically Media's special projects reporter, where he currently edits Technical.ly's Grow PA series. He reports for both Technical.ly and Generocity and was a Philly News Award winner for Community Reporting of the Year in 2016. A proud native of Allentown, Pa., the Temple University alumnus calls Fishtown home.

  • Lawanda Horton

    Agreed. I think foundation support and community buy in are key.

From our Partners

Sign-up for regular updates from Generocity