PA Neighborhood Assistance Program Spared from Budget Cuts - Generocity Philly

Aug. 7, 2014 1:38 pm

PA Neighborhood Assistance Program Spared from Budget Cuts

Pennsylvania’s Neighborhood Assistance Program (NAP), which offers tax credits to businesses that assist nonprofits working in distressed areas, had recently gone from being on the verge of expansion to the chopping block as state representatives have debated the program’s future. The Housing Alliance of Pennsylvania announced earlier this month that the program will be spared […]

Pennsylvania’s Neighborhood Assistance Program (NAP), which offers tax credits to businesses that assist nonprofits working in distressed areas, had recently gone from being on the verge of expansion to the chopping block as state representatives have debated the program’s future.

The Housing Alliance of Pennsylvania announced earlier this month that the program will be spared from budget cuts, but an expansion of the program now seems unlikely.

NAP was created over 40 years ago in an effort to encourage businesses to contribute to their communities. A number of programs within NAP offer tax credits, between 55-80 percent, to businesses that support qualified nonprofits. Some of the programs are long-term, up to five years. Others are one-time donations of money or in-kind support such as pro-bono services and materials.

This spring Rep. Tom Killion introduced a bill to expand and modernize NAP. The bill would have doubled its pool of money and expanded many of its programs, including adding an affordable housing tax credit.

State and local advocacy organizations such as the Housing Alliance of Pennsylvania and the Philadelphia Association of Community Development Corporations came out in support of the bill.

However, bill was put on the back-burner  after the budget season began and cuts to a number of tax credit programs were proposed to increase revenue. There is no sign that the bill will be pushed forward in the near future, according to Liz Hersh, executive director of the Housing Alliance. In the meantime though, businesses and nonprofits can continue to benefit from the program.

For more information on NAP, read the program guidelines here.

Photo via Flickr user arianraven

-30-
LEAVE A COMMENT

From our Partners

Village of the Arts seeks to deepen and scale its impact as it reflects on its legacy

How Temple’s Small Business Development Center is working to bridge the digital divide

An advantage of the government’s new payments for families: Not humiliating poor people

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

Village of the Arts seeks to deepen and scale its impact as it reflects on its legacy

Fort Washington, PA

Kelly Anne Dolan Memorial Fund

Development Director

Apply Now
Lower Gwynedd, PA

Mercy Volunteer Corps

Administrative Assistant

Apply Now
Philadelphia

The Pew Center for Arts and Heritage

Program Assistant, project funding area

Apply Now

Black-led BanksGiving and Empify are focused on changing financial futures

Millions of American parents will soon get a monthly allowance: 4 questions answered

Denise Gomez DelSignore is part of a team focused on fostering economic stability in Philly

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

On June 17, First Person Arts and EMOC launch a virtual event they hope will shatter misperceptions of men of color

Philadelphia, PA

Philabundance

Major Gift Officer

Apply Now
Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia Youth Network, Inc

Senior Business Partnership Specialist

Apply Now
Philadelphia, PA

Philadelphia Youth Network, Inc

Human Resources Generalist

Apply Now

Sign-up for daily news updates from Generocity