How horticulture and green space can be used as community-building tools - Generocity Philly

People

Jan. 8, 2016 11:00 am

How horticulture and green space can be used as community-building tools

New Pennsylvania Horticultural Society prez Matt Rader knows a thing or two about the topic from his time with Fairmount Park Historical Preservation Trust.

Look at all that green stuff.

(Photo by Flickr user Robbin Atwell, used under a Creative Commons license)

Horticulture provides two dimensions of use as a community-building tool.

Not only does it give communities a project to work on something together, but the results that stem from that work make communities a better place to live, work and play.

Community gardens provide access to healthier food options. Beautifying a vacant lot adds value and removes blight. Greening helps foster a sense of place in neighborhoods and reinforces a sense of beauty across the city.

Recently appointed Pennsylvania Horticultural Society President Matt Rader knows a thing or two about community building. Most recently, Rader was executive director at the Fairmount Park Historic Preservation Trust. There, he rallied “broad groups of community members and volunteers,” city government and the philanthropy sector around a common vision for the park. PHS, he said, is part of that same network.

Rader said his success with PHS will only be as great as the organization’s ability to work with those groups to create and implement ideas about urban greening and how it can transform the city. At FPHPT, Rader helped find new uses for the park’s historic buildings through partnerships with both nonprofits and private entities.

“It took a lot of conversation and change management to make that happen — understanding common aspirations for the park to be a more vital place with more activities and better maintenance,” Rader said. “I’ve got experience building coalition and it’s really going to be a key part of our success [at PHS].”

But first, Rader said his first steps at PHS will be to get to know the society’s full landscape of supporters — members, volunteers and financiers. He’ll also be working to get to know Mayor Jim Kenney‘s administration and identify key partners in the philanthropy sector.

That will reinforce PHS’s mission to create healthier, more sustainable, more beautiful communities.

-30-
LEAVE A COMMENT

From our Partners

‘Germantown Neighbors’ share personal stories and reflect on gentrification

Neighborhoods in North Philly focus on violence — causes and solutions 

Why we’re closing our company Slack and launching a Generocity channel

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

Village of the Arts seeks to deepen and scale its impact as it reflects on its legacy

Philadelphia, PA

Maternity Care Coalition

Director of Development

Apply Now
Philadelphia

Youth Sentencing & Reentry Project (YSRP)

Reentry Coordinator

Apply Now
Philadelphia

Youth Sentencing & Reentry Project (YSRP)

Program Coordinator

Apply Now

NKCDC’s Nourish brings meal kit delivery service to a community that otherwise may not have access to it

Residents will explore ‘Places of Power’ in Norris Square

How is your community better or worse than it was in February 2020?

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

On June 17, First Person Arts and EMOC launch a virtual event they hope will shatter misperceptions of men of color

Philadelphia, Norristown, NJ

Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence

School-Based Program Coordinator, Mentor 2.0

Apply Now
Philadelphia, Norristown, NJ

Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence

School-Based Program Coordinator (College Bigs)

Apply Now
Philadelphia, Norristown, NJ

Big Brothers Big Sisters Independence

School-Based Program Coordinator (Beyond School Walls)

Apply Now

Sign-up for daily news updates from Generocity