Wednesday, February 28, 2024

Follow

Contact

Philly Police just released some important public safety data

Pedestrian and vehicle stops in Philadelphia. April 27, 2016 Category: FeaturedResultsShort
On the margins of Philadelphia, the city’s impoverished neighborhoods are bleeding.

The relationship between race, socioeconomic status and law enforcement is unstable, and the Philadelphia Police Department (PPD) wants to start holding itself accountable for the actions of its officers.

That’s why PPD recently released data on crime incidents, shooting victims and police stops in conjunction with the Police Data Initiative, a White House-led push to improve transparency in local law enforcement across the country.

https://twitter.com/PhilaGovData/status/725047453641281536

Led by PPD Director of Research and Analysis Kevin Thomas and released through the city’s data portal OpenDataPhilly, the postings include interactive visualizations that add some context to the numbers.

View the data

The data reveal some stark realities about race, poverty, crime and law enforcement in Philadelphia.

For example, here’s one side of a visualization mapping poverty levels throughout Philadelphia that was posted with the data:

ppddata2

Map showing poverty levels.

And here’s the other side of that visualization, mapping the city’s racial minority population:

ppddata

Map showing racial minority population.

And a map of where pedestrian/vehicle stops are concentrated in the city.

ppddata3

Pedestrian/vehicle stops in Philadelphia.

“The question is often raised about whether a specific racial or ethnic group is over represented in pedestrian and vehicle stop,” reads a Police Data Initiative post. “On the surface, a cursory examination of the racial distribution of the pedestrian and vehicle stops, may suggest this is the case.”

From our Partners

Here’s what the racial breakdown of pedestrian/vehicle stops between 2014 and now looks like on the surface:

  • 714,000 Black
  • 231,000 White
  • 92,700 Latino
  • 23,400 Asian

PPD affirms the data only show a “partial picture” and that the practice of stop and frisk is not condoned within the department. But officers do practice “ped stops” allowing them to stop individuals and conduct a weapons search if they have “reasonable suspicion to believe that the person stopped is armed.”

Are those suspicions justified? Here’s a map of where violent crime has happened over the past two years (and here’s a map of gun violence).

ppddata4

Violent crime in Philadelphia.

“Crime does not occur in a vacuum,” reads a Police Data Initiative post.

According to the visuals above, the post is right. Crime doesn’t exist in one vacuum in Philadelphia. It exists in three: North, West and Southwest Philadelphia, where a socioeconomic pull of gravity keeps crime in neighborhoods.

Project

OpenDataPhilly

Trending News

Philadelphia's Fiscal Tapestry: Untangling the Challenges and Oversight to Provide Needed Services Alesia Bani
Stuck in the Bucket: Stopping the Overflow of Poverty Valerie Johnson
Beyond Poverty: Healthcare Deserts, Part 3 Marilyn Kai Jewett
Monday Minute with Andre Simms Monique Curry-Mims
Healthcare Deserts Part 4: Philanthropic Solutions Marilyn Kai Jewett

Related Posts

January 12, 2024

Delco Businesses Hit Snag in Quest for Equitable County Contracts

Read More >
January 16, 2023

Why Philanthropy Can't Overlook the Mayoral Primaries

Read More >
October 28, 2021

6 things we know about you

Read More >