Does the Philly United Way have a Ferguson problem? - Generocity Philly

People

Oct. 5, 2017 12:55 pm

Does the Philly United Way have a Ferguson problem?

It's unacceptable for the regional funder, with a mission to fight generational poverty, to have an all-white executive team and mostly white regional board, argues Otis Bullock.

Philadelphia: We're all in this together.

(Photo by R. Kennedy for Visit Philadelphia)

This is a guest post by Diversified Community Services' Otis Bullock.
Lately, I have been concerned with the direction of our regional United Way’s leadership.

The United Way of Greater Philadelphia and Southern New Jersey does not have a single person of color on its executive leadership team. Not one. People of color represent less than a quarter of UWGPSNJ’s massive regional board of directors. With its mission to end generational poverty, you’d think the United Way would do better and I know it can.

Consider these numbers from the My Brother’s Keeper initiative:

  • While 36.1 percent of Philadelphia’s youth live in poverty, Black children make up 20.4 percent of that number with Hispanic children coming in second at 9.4 percent.
  • Approximately 2,900 children in Philadelphia are homeless, 78 percent of them Black.
  • More than 66 percent of Black children live in a single female-headed household while more than 58 percent of Hispanic children live in a single female-headed household.
  • Research shows that a child living in a single female-headed family is nearly five times more likely to be poor than a child living in a married family.
  • Seventy two percent of the 10- to 18-year-olds in the juvenile justice system are Black.

These are all issues that the United Way seeks to address when its asks us to donate generously.

Three years ago, Derwin Dubose wrote a piece for the Nonprofit Quarterly regarding the nonprofit sector’s general lack of representation and how “the glaring disparity in nonprofit leadership bears a striking similarity to Ferguson,” where Michael Brown was killed. In Ferguson, two-thirds of the city’s population were Black, while “whites served as mayor, five of six city councilors, six of seven school board members, and 50 of 52 police officers.”

If UWGPSNJ’s mission is to eradicate generational poverty, and its biggest beneficiary is a largely Black and Latino population, why is it that there are so few people of color represented in United Way’s leadership? This is what Dubose calls the “Ferguson Problem.” I just never expected one of Philadelphia’s biggest philanthropic leaders to suffer from it.

From our Partners

I’m also surprised as the UWGPSNJ states in its own core values that it “promotes a culture of inclusion and seeks talented staff from all backgrounds.” Yet recently, we watched UWGPSJ part ways with its only person of color in an executive leadership position, leaving the executive team 100 percent white. Despite its rhetoric about inclusion, UWGPSNJ is currently moving backward.

People of color have been effectively relegated to being recipients of charity instead of being empowered to improve their own circumstances. The corporate and private donor class should not find this acceptable.

But all hope isn’t lost. There are two very important ways to get our local United Way to turn it around. First, funders have to lead the way. Donors must demand nonprofit diversity even of the United Way. Secondly, UWGPSNJ must aggressively go beyond the rhetoric of inclusion and aggressively recruit people of color as candidates for its executive staff and membership to its board.

UWGPSNJ is currently looking for a new CEO. Maybe it can start there.

-30-
VIEW COMMENTS

From our Partners

Report: Race, housing insecurity, and COVID-19 are connected

Opinion: We could have ended family detention in PA in 2016. Why is it allowed to continue?

How Black cartographers put racism on the map of America

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

Inscripción Doble en Congreso: Lo que trae el futuro

1515 Arch Street Philadelphia, PA 19102

City of Philadelphia, Rebuild

Director of Evaluation and Learning

Apply Now
Remote; from home office

New Horizons Senior Center

Communications Assistant

Apply Now
Philadelphia and Bala Cynwyd

JFCS of Greater Philadelphia

Youth Engagement Program Coordinator

Apply Now

If accessibility seems an unsolvable riddle, the Penn Museum offers an answer

This Philly symposium was born from the rich intellectual tradition — and the erasure — of Afro-Latinxs

What did ‘A Better Chicago’ do for poverty that could work in Philadelphia?

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

Dual Enrollment at Congreso: Where does it go from here?

Philadelphia, PA

United Way of Greater Philadelphia & Southern New Jersey

Chief Knowledge Officer

Apply Now
Philadelphia, PA

Campus Philly

President

Apply Now
Philadelphia, PA

The Pew Charitable Trusts

Senior Officer Pew Fund

Apply Now

Sign-up for daily news updates from Generocity