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QSPACES talked LGBTQ health on Twitter with Harvard and two indie popstars

Singers Tegan and Sara. November 28, 2017 Category: FeaturedResultsShort

Disclosures

Editor's note: The spelling of Catherine Hofmann's last name has been corrected and WebJunto's involvement with QSPACES has been clarified. (11/28, 1:55 p.m.)
QSPACES helped make Twitter a little more friendly for LGBTQ folks seeking healthcare information on Monday.

https://twitter.com/qspacesapp/status/933380030859759617

The free online platform, billed as a “Yelp for the LGBTQ community and doctors” that allows users to rate local physicians on their LBGTQ competency, was launched this summer by Philly-based spouses Catherine Hofmann and Nic Anthony.

On Monday afternoon, the founders teamed up with the Tegan and Sara Foundation and Harvard Medical School’s LGBT program director, Jessica Halem, to talk healthcare with LGBTQ people and medical providers from around the world using the hashtag #QueerandCaredforTegan and Sara are Canadian twin indie pop musicians who launched their foundation last year to support LGBTQ women and girls.

QSPACES’ Hofmann said Harvard’s Halem reached out over the summer to invite QSPACES to participate in the Twitter chat because of their relevant work.

Questions ranged from “How often should I go to the doctor?” to “What’s the best way to come out to my doctor?” Check out the whole conversation here.

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Hofmann said this morning that what continues to surprise her in conversations like this one is how many bad experiences LGBTQ healthcare seekers have faced with doctors.

“It’s almost mind-blowing that there are people practicing medicine that are not sure which tests to run, that are providing wrong information” to LGBTQ patients, she said.

https://twitter.com/qspacesapp/status/935249177105371136

Hofmann said one of her favorite moments from Monday’s chat was a discussion about how healthcare seekers can tell if a provider is LGBTQ-friendly. Suggestions included rainbow stickers or LGBTQ magazines in the waiting room — but of course, QSPACES aims to help patients know even before they arrive.

“We’re trying to get information to people as early in that process as we can,” she said.

Elsewhere, QSPACES has been busy forging partnerships with LGBTQ organizations and hospital systems to expand into the Midwestern states in the coming months. And Hofmann is pitching QSPACES at LGBTQ entrepreneurship event StartOut Demo Day in New York City tomorrow in the hopes of raising capital — so far, QSPACES has been largely self-funded, and its platform was built partially via a community partnership for in-kind services by dev firm WebJunto.

Hofmann and Anthony also recently launched QSPACES Trainings, an LGBTQ competency training program for local nonprofits, hospitals and the like. Learn more here.

https://twitter.com/DoppelgangerJoe/status/935241402744692736

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