50K people marched on Saturday. Here are 8 from Philly's impact community - Generocity Philly

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Jan. 23, 2017 10:41 am

50K people marched on Saturday. Here are 8 from Philly’s impact community

Just a few examples of how the social impact community and local representatives showed up at the Women's March.

"Make America Kind Again."

(Photo by Julie Zeglen)

Fifty thousand people took to Ben Franklin Parkway for the Women’s March on Philadelphia this weekend, joining hundreds of sister marches around the world to rally for the defense of women’s rights under our new president.

Members of Philly’s social impact community — nonprofits, local government, higher education, the School District of Philadelphia — represented our city powerfully. Some gave speeches, some wrote publicly about the experience and some simply showed up with signs and family in tow.

Here are just a few examples.

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Witnesses to Hunger’s Michelle Taylor, a.k.a. Feminista Jones, spoke about the dangers of white feminism and the importance of celebrating Black feminist figures.

The school district’s kindergarten transition fellow, Ami Patel Hopkins, wrote on Instagram that her reason for marching was “because it is important to me to use my voice and hold my politicians accountable to the people they serve, especially our nation’s beautiful children.”

 

Rep. Donna Bullock’s speech tackled the need for intersectional feminism and acknowledgement of privilege.

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In her speech, Women’s Law Project Executive Director Carol Tracey also referenced the need for intersectional feminism as well as the continuing need for WLP’s work. As quoted in the Inquirer, she said, “In my 40 years of feminist activism, this might be the most exciting day of my life.”

Allie Ilagan, marketing and communications head at Wharton Social Impact Initiative, wrote about bringing her young daughter to the march and what she learned from it.

As our sister site Technical.ly Philly reported, TechGirlz founder Tracey Welson-Rossman gave a speech about pay equity and women in tech. Last week, she also wrote an essay for Huffington Post explaining why she’d be showing up: “I march to economically empower women in America.”

Councilwoman Helen Gym spoke about the need for supporting Planned Parenthood, immigrants and education.

Mayor Jim Kenney committed again to signing a bill that will make it illegal for employers to ask job applicants about their salary history.

Also, there were pups.

March doggo

“Keep your paws off our laws!” and “Democracy is golden.” (Photo by Julie Zeglen)

March doggo 2

“I will piss on your wall.” (Photo by Julie Zeglen)

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