You know we’ve got your back. But who are the Generocity team members, really? - Generocity Philly

Purpose

Jul. 19, 2019 9:04 am

You know we’ve got your back. But who are the Generocity team members, really?

As Generocity's 10th anniversary approaches, get to know the people behind your social impact site.

Current and former members of the Generocity team (with Technically Media's operations manager Jane Lee).

(Photo by Dominique Nicole)

Updated to add a link, 7/19/19 at 2:06 p.m.
It is fun — isn’t it — to catch a glimpse of the person behind the professional?

You may know the Generocity team from corresponding with us by email. Or you may follow us on social media and have a sense of who we are from that. Or, maybe you know one or the other of us IRL.

But you probably don’t know the team members as well as you will if you finish reading this.

As with the recent post introducing our readers to our new writers, this post turns the tables on our usual coverage — looking within instead of without — and is intended to give you greater insight into the people who are charged with serving and covering the nonprofit and social impact sector of the city on a daily basis.

This month our editorial calendar focus is “The Workplace,” and this post is part of that. Technically Media — the parent organization of Generocity — has a corporate culture that celebrates the unique talents and perspectives its staff members bring to our work. That makes this workplace a very cool place, a place where people trust each other enough to be more than the headshot and polished blurb on an “About” page.

So, on this sweltering, nearly 100-degree day, get to know the very cool  Generocity team —  and the editor who is delighted she gets to hang out at the cool kids’ table every day.


Vincent Better

Vincent Better, vice president of Philadelphia Initiatives. (Photo by Dominique Nicole)

How many years (or months) have you worked at Generocity? Three years.

What aspect of your work at Generocity do you like best? Being able to learn more about and connect with the great work so many organizations represent.

Three adjectives to describe yourself? Empathetic, determined, prepared.

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If you had a theme song what would it be, and why? This is a hard one … Footprints by A Tribe Called Quest. When that album dropped, that particular song was like nothing I had heard and it resonated with me. The lyrical cadence, musical samples, and influences were incredible (to me) on that first album.

What’s your guilty pleasure? Oh, that’s not for public knowledge! If I had to share one, it would be … nope can’t share that one either!

What’s your style? Cool Dad.

Favorite spot in the city, and why? I still love the Belmont Plateau. It’s so close but so far from downtown, with a great view and the ability to be quiet or active any given day of the week.

Which of your achievements makes you proudest? Graduating college, with a double major, a semester early.

How do you work to make change happen in the world? Mentoring, connecting people and resources, and being involved where I believe I can make a difference.


Fatima Conteh

Fatima Conteh, events coordinator. (Photo by Madasyn Andrews)

How many years (or months) have you worked at Generocity? 10 months

What aspect of your work at Generocity do you like best? I get the chance to work at an organization that amplifies, connects, and generates resources for the communities that I come from and care about the most. What more can a girl ask for?

Three adjectives to describe yourself? Authentic, strategic, and unflappable.

If you had a theme song what would it be, and why? Have you ever seen the early 2000s cartoon, As Told By Ginger? The theme song — by Macy Gray— is the soundtrack to my life. It’s short, but the song is about being appreciative of where you are in life.

What’s your guilty pleasure? Binge watching Netflix shows — I can’t control myself. I can finish an entire season in one sitting and I am not ashamed.

What’s your style? If Tracee Ellis Ross and Solange‘s closets got into a fist fight — that would be the perfect way to describe my style. Some days, Solange wins. Other days, Tracee is victorious. Every day is fabulous.

Favorite spot in the city, and why? West Philly, baby! From 30th Street Station through Malcolm X Park and beyond, there’s an energy in West Philly that cannot replicated.

Which of your achievements makes you proudest? Building my meetup, Soul Circle. It is a group of local creatives that meet once a month to realign their goals with their intentions. It’s been life changing to cultivate a community that forces people to think about the ways in which they are caring for themselves.

How do you work to make change happen in the world? I work to encourage people of color to pay closer attention to their mental health and to expose unconventional approaches to self care. If therapy doesn’t work for you, then what does?


Jeanette Lloyd

 

Jeanette Lloyd, director of marketing and partnerships.

How many years (or months) have you worked at Generocity? Four years.

What aspect of your work at Generocity do you like best? Making connections that spark impact, and the amazing community of passionate citizens that we serve.

Three adjectives to describe yourself? Organized, loyal, chill AF.

If you had a theme song what would it be, and why? Funky Child by Lords of the Underground.

What’s your guilty pleasure? Laziness.

What’s your style? Street vintage funk.

Favorite spot in the city, and why? Fairmount Park (specifically the Kelly DriveRiver Drive loop on my bike, with headphones on and no helmet. 15 miles of pure fun).

Which of your achievements makes you proudest? I like to look back at all of the talented and smart people I have been able to connect to a variety of opportunities and feel the most pride that I was able to spot the right person to fit that opportunity and took advantage of my position to make sparks fly.

How do you work to make change happen in the world? I speak up to lend my voice to the voiceless and I never shy away from a necessary confrontation that could bring positive change even if it makes people (and myself) uncomfortable.


Sabrina Vourvoulias

Sabrina Vourvoulias, editor of Generocity. (Photo by Liza Gross)

How many years (or months) have you worked at Generocity? Six months.

What aspect of your work at Generocity do you like best? The people! The genuinely extraordinary folks I work with, and the remarkable people I get to interview.

Three adjectives to describe yourself? Outspoken, impassioned, tenacious.

If you had a theme song what would it be, and why? J.Lo’s Let’s Get Loud. What is it that Emma Goldman is reputed to have said? “If I can’t dance, I don’t want to be part of your revolution.” Plus, Latinx loud is necessary. Being loud and presente is crucial at this precise moment in history.

What’s your guilty pleasure? Mexican food. And the more traditional, the better. Which means I happily eat (and cook) food made with — wait for it — lard. And you know what? The resulting taste erases the guilt.

What’s your style? I live at the intersection of Adrienne Rich, Gloria Anzaldúa and Patti Smith streets, with occasional forays down Frida Kahlo Avenue and Simone de Beauvoir Boulevard.

Favorite spot in the city, and why? I have a soft spot for Norris Square. The park is sweet, and home to the stately Puerto Rican tree (honest, that’s its name). Then, all around the park, are neighborhood organizations doing really fantastic community-centered work: West Kensington Ministry, Galaei, Norris Square Neighborhood Project, Las Parcelas, etc. Plus, the Buzz Café is a nice place to hang out with a coffee and a book.

Which of your achievements makes you proudest? That I wrote a novel two publishers have wanted to publish, and readers say was prescient.

How do you work to make change happen in the world? I use my platform to amplify Latinx and immigrant voices. I mentor, volunteer and engage in community-building with a number of formal and informal networks. I speak out, keep my eyes open, and write like the world depends on defending human rights for all — because it does.

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