Center for Literacy Provides Classes and Tutoring for 1,600 Adults Every Year - Generocity Philly

Results

Mar. 19, 2015 11:30 am

Center for Literacy Provides Classes and Tutoring for 1,600 Adults Every Year

Over 200,000 Philadelphians over 18 do not have a high school diploma.

There are over 200,000 Philadelphians over the age of 18 that do not have a high school diploma, and as a result, they are nearly twice as likely to live in poverty as an individual with a secondary school credential, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2011 American Community Survey.

The Center for Literacy, which started in 1968 as a volunteer organization, provides classes and tutoring services for 1,600 adults per year. According to the Center, education is key to escaping poverty, and earning a GED can be the first step towards attaining a living wage job and/or gaining entry into a college or technical school.

“Center for Literacy’s services are essential to grow an educated workforce for a growing city through the preparation of adults for the world of work and to be their children’s first and best teachers. Research has shown that the success of child in school is dependent on the level of education of his/her mother,” said Michael Westover, president and CEO of Center for Literacy, in an email. “Without Center for Literacy’s services, Philadelphia will be unable to attract and keep employers and turn its schools around.”

The Center for Literacy offers a variety of classes, including math, reading/writing, social studies and science classes. The program also offers these classes at a variety of levels, including adult basic education, adult secondary education/GED prep, and ESL/English Language Civics (offered at Low, Intermediate and Advanced levels).

The program’s typical student is female, African American, unemployed and low income and/or reliant on public assistance programs, according to the Center for Literacy’s website.

“Tens of thousands of Philadelphians have passed through Center for Literacy’s doors since 1968,” Westover said.  “Although it is difficult to track them all, many have gone on to postsecondary education and training, and others have gone on to family-sustaining careers in healthcare and education; Philadelphia’s two biggest industries. At least two have gone on to be published authors.”

The Center is currently enrolling for all of its programs. All prospective students at Center For Literacy go through an initial orientation where they are given standardized tests in order to place them in the correct class level. Orientations take place about three or four times a month, and students typically attend classes twice a week.

From our Partners

“Literacy is the foundation upon which civilization rests. All arts, industries and trades, from literature to law to architecture and manufacturing, are dependent upon it,” Westover said.

“Philadelphia’s success as a leader among world cities in the 21st century as it was in the 18th and 19th centuries depends on the education of its citizens.”

For more information on how to enroll or volunteer at Center for Literacy, visit www.centerforliteracy.org.

Image via Center for Literacy

 

-30-
VIEW COMMENTS
  • jones245234@mail.ru

    If you’ve been struggling with how to write essays, this article will show you four easy steps to writing consistently high quality essays. how to write informal essay.

  • selene42456

    Most often today, students experience the bulk of their storytelling experiences through the screen. It could be a television screen, a movie screen or, increasingly, the computer screen. Since stories shown on the screen are just that, stories, the traditional analysis of literary texts taught in English classes will help. good site.

  • Thomas

    Library and information science assume essential half for learning critical written work. On the off likelihood that you just have to be compelled to act in critical composition then you got to visit edges that have real learning and qualified author for your task work. http://www.researchproject.biz/about-us/

  • dougherty5464

    We all learned how to write nursing diagnoses and care plans in school. They started something like this: Nursing Diagnosis: “Ineffective Breathing Patterns related to infection as evidenced by a change in respiratory pattern and tachypnea.” Have you written a nursing diagnoses like this since you started your nursing career? Probably not, if you work on a busy unit. Even if you had the time, writing long, wordy nursing diagnoses that the rest of your nursing team might not understand seems useless in improving patient care. Here are some practical guidelines to help you write understandable, useful nursing diagnoses and nursing care plans. nursing research paper writing service

From our Partners

Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance’s new report explains why rich donors give

#PTW18 kicks off next Friday. Here are 15 events for social impact pros

Reminder: The future of philanthropy is mission-aligned investing and general operating support

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

12 Philly immigrants who are ready to mobilize

Philadelphia

Fairmount Ventures Inc

Associate

Apply Now
Philadelphia

Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation

Communication Manager-Read by 4th

Apply Now
Skippack, PA

Center for Loss and Bereavement

Director of Development

Apply Now

Meet Philly Tech Week’s newest conference for change makers: Introduced by Technical.ly

3 things your fundraising team wants to tell you but can’t

SPONSORED

Generocity Philly

Redefining civic participation, one new leader at a time

Center City Philadelphia

Clarifi

Financial Educator

Apply Now
neighborhoods in West & North Philadelphia

FAB YOUTH PHILLY

Play Captain Supervisor & Project Manager

Apply Now
Media, PA

The Foundation for Delaware Co

Associate Director of Grantmaking Services

Apply Now

Sign-up for regular updates from Generocity